Standalone streaming services versus aggregators: Which model will win?

Standalone streaming services versus aggregators: Which model will win?In October 2017, CBS shared that its standalone streaming service, CBS All Access, has seen a record number of new subscribers in a single week. And according to the company, Trekkies are responsible for the bump: the new series “Star Trek Discovery” was a hit among fans, with exclusive access to Discovery for subscribers driving a record-breaking number of signups.

“Consumer response to the launch of ‘Star Trek: Discovery’ has been tremendous,” Marc DeBevoise, president of CBS Interactive, revealed. “The buildup to the show’s premiere led us to a record-setting month, week and ultimately day of sign-ups.”

The show, which was already renewed for a second season, is the latest win for CBS All Access, which has become an unlikely success in the competitive streaming service market. Since its launch in late 2014, the subscription streaming service has expanded to a userbase of more than one million users. The company is now planning on taking CBS All Access global.

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Dear Energy Santa: Make Sure You’re Connected

Dear Energy Santa: Make Sure You’re Connected

The Internet of Things (IoT) is catapulting the energy industry into a new era of products and services, and the demands and expectations of utilities are rapidly changing. According to the IDC, energy utilities are currently the third largest investor in IoT ($66 billion) and this will alter how these companies interact with their customers. As an 80’s kid, I am reminded of a memorable song by Stereo MCs entitled Connected. The song’s chorus goes:

If you make sure you’re connected,
The writing’s on the wall,
But if your mind’s neglected,
Stumble you might fall…

More than ever, our connections with people, places and things drive and define who we are and what we do. These connections are directly impacted by the IoT explosion across our society. Back in 2008, more “things” were already connected to the internet than there were people in the world, and the momentum of this trend has multiplied over the past 10 years.
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An Alternative Solution to Market Research Panels and Online Communities

An Alternative Solution to Market Research Panels and Online CommunitiesWe live in a world where consumer data are growing rapidly. Nearly every behavior on the internet is tracked, wireless devices constantly share our location and activities, and smart appliances disseminate troves of data into the ether. And, by some accounts, global data are expected to double every two years for at least a decade.

While this is not a new phenomenon, the impact is still hard to understand. Thanks to this explosion of data, many energy utilities have access to exponentially more customer information than just a few years ago, and this information is often used ineffectively, and in some cases, not used at all. From detailed demographic and profiling data, program participation histories, and rich behavioral data, the opportunities for market research insights are immense.

It’s no wonder that many utilities are looking to leverage these data to build custom online panels and Market Research Online Communities (MROCs) to support their research needs. Both offer a means of gaining quick and valuable insights without having to negotiate some of the more challenging aspects of market research, namely, sample preparation and respondent recruitment. Continue reading

Why Live TV Streaming Isn’t Tuned In To Consumer Needs

Why Live TV Streaming Isn’t Tuned In To Consumer NeedsNot too long ago, the only viable option for watching video in the home was to subscribe to a cable or satellite TV provider. Sure, there was the fringe population who cut the cord and either relied on over-the-air (OTA) network broadcasts or streamed Netflix onto a PC that would then be connected via a mess of cables, software and converters to a television or projector (phew!). The rest of us, however, were at the mercy of the cable and satellite companies, and virtually every satisfaction study conducted shows that customers have not been happy with these providers for a very long time.
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Banks: Commodity is Not a Dirty Word

It’s not uncommon for financial services market researchers to have to share results that are not what clients and their stakeholders were hoping to hear. And yet speaking research-driven truths is an imperative when developing products and improving the customer experience.

This is especially true when consumers see a client’s product as a “commodity,” meaning something all financial services providers offer that are pretty much interchangeable in terms of features, benefits and costs. This is particularly tough when the client’s product team is involved because it can feel like a non-starter, as though there’s nothing they can do to differentiate the offering.

This couldn’t be further from the truth.

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Keeping Insurance Customers Satisfied After a Natural Catastrophe

Having just spent a long weekend in Central Oregon, I saw first-hand the haze of smoke from numerous forest fires filling the sky and listened to locals’ concerns about the progress of fires nearest them. This brought the routine news stories featuring a succession of natural disasters—from tropical storms along the Gulf Coast to wildfires across the Pacific Northwest to flooding in southern California—into sharp focus. Despite the certainty that these events will occur, forecasting when and where has become a multi-billion dollar business challenge for the US insurance industry. But one thing remains constant—each claim is experienced one household at a time by customers who never expected that it would happen to them.

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Personalization Is Not a Technology Problem—It’s an Insight Challenge

Personalized shopping experience

Retailers that can’t deliver a personalized experience are at serious risk of becoming irrelevant soon. According to a study from Accenture, 75% of shoppers are more likely to do business with companies that recognize them by name, offer relevant recommendations and remember their purchase history.

This study highlights that we’re in the midst of a paradigm shift in the shopper-retailer relationship. With mobile technology and a wealth of information at their fingertips, shoppers want an experience that’s tailored to their individual needs and desires. They crave a one-to-one relationship with the retailers they do business with—and they’ll happily switch brands if that expectation isn’t met.

In the race for personalization, digital natives have an early lead. That’s because they’ve built infrastructure and business models that enable the real-time collection of data and the delivery of customer needs. But both incumbents and newcomers in retail need to realize that personalization isn’t simply a technology problem—it’s an insight problem that revolves around the customer journey.

To get personalization right, retailers need to take a step back, start from the beginning and look at the big picture. It requires understanding not just the logical aspect of purchases, but also the emotional triggers that convince shoppers to buy.

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Strengthening the Patient/Provider Relationship

Strengthening the Patient/Provider Relationship

In the rapidly evolving healthcare marketplace, the role of a primary care physician (PCP) is changing. Healthcare organizations are working to surround PCPs with broader care teams—nutritionists, mental health professionals, social workers and physical therapists—to provide PCPs time to focus on the most critical patients. In addition, PCPs provide a valuable link in referring patients to a healthcare organization’s specialty care offering, leveraging the power of a unified electronic medical record, driving pay-for-performance reimbursements, and strengthening patient loyalty. It’s probably not surprising, therefore, that health systems we work with are seeking to learn more about the patient/provider relationship.

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Is the Next Big Bank a Bank?

Amazon recently announced that its Amazon Lending service surpassed $1billion in small business loans over the past 12 months.

Wait, Amazon? Small business loans? Amazon isn’t a bank, but that doesn’t seem to matter. And that got me thinking, could Amazon be a bank for consumers, too?

Most likely, yes. Trust is the foundation of any relationship, especially when money is involved. Market Strategies’ financial services market research reveals that half of consumers would trust a company that does not specialize in banking to provide their banking. Of those, 26% would trust Amazon, 22% would trust Apple, 21% would trust Google and a whopping 63% would trust PayPal. Not surprisingly, younger consumers (58% of those 18-34) are even more likely to trust a non-bank to provide their banking.

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Broken Guitars and Broken Promises

How Customer Service is Being Transformed by the Growth of Mobile Messaging   

The world watched in astonishment a few weeks ago as a video surfaced of a United Airlines passenger being physically dragged from a plane after he refused to give up his seat on an over-booked flight. The airline’s initial response was almost as catastrophic a PR disaster as the actual event, going into detail on the policies and procedures, but showing none of the human compassion that all of us would expect from a brand that purports to care about its customers.

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