Standalone streaming services versus aggregators: Which model will win?

Standalone streaming services versus aggregators: Which model will win?In October 2017, CBS shared that its standalone streaming service, CBS All Access, has seen a record number of new subscribers in a single week. And according to the company, Trekkies are responsible for the bump: the new series “Star Trek Discovery” was a hit among fans, with exclusive access to Discovery for subscribers driving a record-breaking number of signups.

“Consumer response to the launch of ‘Star Trek: Discovery’ has been tremendous,” Marc DeBevoise, president of CBS Interactive, revealed. “The buildup to the show’s premiere led us to a record-setting month, week and ultimately day of sign-ups.”

The show, which was already renewed for a second season, is the latest win for CBS All Access, which has become an unlikely success in the competitive streaming service market. Since its launch in late 2014, the subscription streaming service has expanded to a userbase of more than one million users. The company is now planning on taking CBS All Access global.

Continue reading

What I Really Want For Christmas Is … Streaming Video that Meets My Needs!

What I Really Want For Christmas Is … Streaming Video that Meets My Needs!With 73% of the population regularly streaming video, consumers are racing to get streaming-capable devices for the holiday season. Not only has it been reported that Amazon accounted for half of all online Black Friday sales, its own Fire TV stick was the second most popular item sold on its site. Likewise, one of the hottest items this season at big-box stores such as Best Buy, Walmart and Target are smart TVs. There is little doubt that today’s consumer has become comfortable with streaming video and is looking for more ways to stream content. Continue reading

What Drives Trust in the Wireless World?

Trust is defined as “to place confidence in, rely on.” Whom do customers trust to provide their wireless service? The importance of this simple question cannot be overstated with wireless carriers facing the stiffest competition in decades. And the field is increasingly more crowded as cable powerhouses like Comcast and Charter join the fray. With more than 90% of US households having cell phones and more than 50% being wireless only (a figure that is growing daily), few industries have such a massive, growing addressable market. And they all face one cold, hard truth: Failing to gain the trust of their customers could be a multi-billion dollar mistake.

That’s why we focused on brand trust in our latest consumer omnibus study. We looked at not only the traditional wireless providers but also other potential entrants, including cable and technology companies, to find out who could disrupt the usual suspects. And, even more importantly, through our technology industry research we explore whether it’s even a wise business move for the likes of Microsoft, Amazon and Apple to throw their hats into the wireless ring. Continue reading

The #1 Brand Health Metric That Social Media Must Own to Win

Many organizations struggle to choose the research approach that best understands and tracks their brand’s health and market position. Last year, the technology market research division at Market Strategies shared its thoughts on NPS and multi-measure approaches as a broader alternative. We fielded questions about social media brands that resulted in a US-based Brand Health Index (BHI), which drew from measures of satisfaction, positive brand sentiment and a brand’s strength at connecting consumers to others.

Fast forward one year to our 2017 Brand Health Study: Do we continue to see value in our BHI when measuring and evaluating brands in the social media space? And can we determine what’s driving a particular brand’s health and momentum (or lack thereof)? Let’s take a look to see how the brands stack up.

Continue reading

How Much SHOULD the iPhone X Cost?  

Market Strategies Releases Exclusive Price Point Analysis   

It’s September, which means the unofficial end of summer, football, a new school year…and a new iPhone release! But this year—the 10th anniversary of the iPhone—Apple is breaking the mold. Why?

  • As contracts have become virtually extinct, consumers are keeping their phones longer, creating a lengthier upgrade cycle. Apple needs to provide a more compelling reason to buy their product than simply, “it’s that time of year again.”
  • Apple has been criticized by some as losing its innovation edge by offering only minimal advancements. This new iPhone X model not only promises to create a new “premium” smartphone but also breaks up Apple’s typical two-year full upgrade cycle.

So, what is new and different about this phone that makes it so special?

Continue reading

Broken Guitars and Broken Promises

How Customer Service is Being Transformed by the Growth of Mobile Messaging   

The world watched in astonishment a few weeks ago as a video surfaced of a United Airlines passenger being physically dragged from a plane after he refused to give up his seat on an over-booked flight. The airline’s initial response was almost as catastrophic a PR disaster as the actual event, going into detail on the policies and procedures, but showing none of the human compassion that all of us would expect from a brand that purports to care about its customers.

Continue reading

Will your video product delight customers?

Will your video product delight customers?

This past week, Hulu officially released the beta version of its live TV streaming product. It’s real, and it’s competitive. It enters the fray of many live TV streaming products that have either launched or have been announced, including Sony Playstation Vue, AT&T’s DirecTV Now, Dish’s Sling TV, Xfinity Instant TV, and YouTube TV. Each of these products offers compelling features at price points lower than traditional Pay TV (satellite, telcos such as Verizon, and cable companies such as Charter Spectrum)—with some like AT&T, Comcast and Dish even cannibalizing their own Pay TV revenues with live TV streaming products.

For these new forms of video offerings to successfully gain customer buy-in and subsequent profitability, they can’t offer everything at rock-bottom prices, at least not forever. Programming costs remain high, even when leveraged with long-standing agreements, and finding the right niche varies not only by platform, but by provider as well.

Continue reading

What will the “winning” video streaming model look like?

Last month, YouTube TV rolled out its “streaming TV” service in five major US cities. Just before that, Comcast and Hulu announced their “streaming TV” services to join an increasingly crowded marketplace with industry heavyweights like AT&T (DirecTV Now), Dish (Sling TV) and Sony (PlayStation Vue). Despite the hype and the big brand names, success isn’t guaranteed for any of these services.

All of these new product offerings are essentially taking the traditional pay TV model that has been around for decades and making it available via the internet at a lower cost than their traditional TV counterparts. For the most part, reactions to these services have been mixed at best, which begs the question: Why aren’t these services knocking it out of the park?

Continue reading

Chance the Rapper: A Case Study in Streaming Success

The transition from physical media and digital downloads to streaming music has not been without speedbumps. Artists have been reluctant to give up royalties from sales for the much less lucrative streaming royalties, but the fight seems to be nearing an end. Physical sales are nearly non-existent and the new benchmark of success is number of streams, but that doesn’t mean everyone in the industry is falling in line. Artists like Taylor Swift have been adamant about seeking fair streaming deals and Thom Yorke has pulled his solo albums from streaming altogether, but there is a new kid on the block who is rewriting the monetization playbook in this streaming-first era.

Continue reading

Is Amazon Chime Poised to Disrupt the Workplace?

Key Takeaway: Given numerous entrants into the videoconferencing sector from established and emerging technology companies—including the recent introduction of Amazon Chime—the market leader position in this space is up for grabs. We at Market Strategies have a lot of questions about how the sector is growing and transforming. How prevalent is videoconferencing? Which platforms are being used? What do companies need to focus on to make their platform ubiquitous?  In this article, we will share our data and insights on the players in this space, including the number one thing a company must do to come out on top.

Videoconferencing technologies have been around for more than a decade, but we have seen them take off with our clients in the past year. We enjoy being able to visually interact with our clients and colleagues so we set out to conduct our own research study to learn more about the experience. While analyzing the results, we were surprised by the introduction of Amazon Chime, which promises “frustration-free online meetings with exceptional audio and video quality.” Why would Amazon enter this market now, with Skype and Hangouts being around for years? Is it insightful or redundant? Will a majority of users asking their colleagues to ‘Skype’ or ‘Hangout’ now ask them to ‘Chime?’

Our data suggests Amazon’s move is insightful. While Skype and Hangouts are certainly popular, there is plenty of room for additional competitors especially since no one seems to have worked out all of the technology bugs. And with a majority of users not wedded to any single platform, Amazon (or another disruptor) has plenty of opportunity to grab market share.

Continue reading